Free, nature-themed yoga program at Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge


(8/12/2019)

Come to the Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge on Tuesday, August 13, from 7-8:30 p.m. for a free adult yoga class taught by Rylee Hedberg, a 230-hour certified yoga instructor and co-owner of I AM YOGA studio in La Crosse, Wis. Her passion is to offer yoga to all experience levels and backgrounds to help create an inclusive community. The class is open to all levels of yogis, ranging from absolute beginners to advanced! It will be held inside the Outdoor Wonders Learning Center. Be sure to bring a yoga mat, comfortable clothes, and water. After class, the refuge will be offering iced tea and lemonade on the observation deck to sip while watching the sunset.

Registration is required to provide the best quality experience to participants. Please contact Nicole at 608-779-2230 or krueger.nicole@uwlax.edu to reserve your spot.

Experience a night of complete relaxation with yoga and the outdoors!

For more information, contact the La Crosse district office at 608-779-2399 or visit the Visitor Center, located at N5727 County Road Z in Onalaska, Wis. Visitor center hours are on Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., February through November. The center is closed on Sundays and all federal holidays. Information on the refuge may also be found at http://www.fws.gov/refuge/upper_mississippi_river/.

The Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge is the most visited refuge in the United States. The refuge extends 261 miles along the Upper Mississippi River from Wabasha to Rock Island, Ill., protecting and preserving habitat for migratory birds, fish, and a variety of other wildlife.

In addition to being the most visited refuge in the country, the “Upper Miss” Refuge has the added complexity of a major navigation system, including 11 locks and dams, within its boundary. It is also a world-class fish and wildlife area that harbors 306 species of birds; 119 species of fish; more than 300 active bald eagle nests; thousands of heron and egret nests; spectacular concentrations of canvasback ducks, tundra swans, and white pelicans; and several threatened or endangered species.

 

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