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  Tuesday July 22nd, 2014    

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Delta duck dinner (12/21/2003)
by Kris Winkelman

Rob Olson, director of operation for Delta Waterfowl's US office in Bismarck, ND, has a reputation for being a wonderful game cook. Rob fixes a lot of different dishes, but"” surprise"” waterfowl is his specialty.

We've been bugging Rob to share some of his recipes for a couple of years now, but he's so busy traveling the country he just hasn't had time to jot one down.

Until now.

A couple weeks ago, spurred by popular demand, Rob finally shared one of his favorite duck recipes with a handful of friends. Fortunately, we were one of them.

We tried Rob's recipe for roast duck, and it was so good we just had to pass it along.

Rob starts by injecting the breasts of whole, plucked ducks with marinade. He prefers teriyaki sauce, but any good marinade will work. You'll need a meat syringe to do the job right. Refrigerate the birds overnight for more flavor.

When it's time to prepare, Rob sprinkles the bird inside and out with Babe Winkelman's Country Cajun seasoning and stuffs the cavity with apples, onions and/or oranges.

Next he places the birds breast down in a roasting pan and pours half a bottle of red wine"”enough wine to cover half an inch"”in the bottom of the roaster. You could substitute a good homemade duck stock, or a 50-50 mix of chicken and beef broth (low-sodium) for the braising liquid.

Rob covers the roaster with tin foil, carefully crimping the edges so the steam can't escape. He places the roaster in a 250-degree oven for three hours.

After three hours he uncovers the birds, rubs garlic-butter on the breast and broils them long enough to crisp the skin.

The final touch is to make gravy from the wine or stock and the dripping by adding chopped mushrooms, garlic and salt and pepper.

You might want to stir in some roux or cornstarch to thicken the gravy.

Rob describes this recipe as "crazy good"¯, and we'd have to agree.

Kris Winkelman's "Ultimate Wild Game and Fish Cookbook" is for sale. Cost of the cookbook is $19.95 plus $4.50 shipping & handling. To order, log onto www.winkelman.com or call 1-800-333-0471 

 

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