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We are all destined to go to sheol/hades (10/21/2007)
From: Keith Lockwood

Much of the confusion surrounding what happens when we die can be traced to the translation of the Hebrew word sheol and the Greek word hades in the Bible. In most English translations of today and in the past, these words are for the majority translated into "hell", but not on a consistent basis. In the Old Testament the King James translators saw difficulty translating sheol into "hell" all of the time. The word sheol is found 65 times, 31 times it is translated "hell"; another 31 times it is translated "grave" and 3 times it is translated "pit". The translators could not cleanly translate sheol into "hell" because for instance Job prayed that God would hide him in sheol until his appointed time (Job 14:13). There is no way a translator is going to claim Job went to hell! But yet, it is here clearly stated that Job knew he was going to "sheol" (translated hades in the Septuagint; the Greek Old Testament) with the hope that he would be resurrected by God. Another problem for the translators was Psalm 49:15 in which King David, a man after God's own heart, speaks of God redeeming his soul from the power of sheol. Man's tradition wants you to believe that there is conscience suffering in hell but Ecclesiastes 9:10 tells us that there is no "work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave (sheol), whither thou goest (KJV)." The Hebrew word sheol, as with the Greek word hades, carries the connotation of something hidden or unseen. That is why they are used to describe death. In death we have no perception and therefore it can only be described as unseen or unperceived. A clean translation for sheol and hades would be "the unseen" for it fits with every passage in which we find it. It is unfortunate that the KJV translators were so heavily influenced by man's tradition and the Christian theological presuppositions of their time. Here is a New Testament example; in Matthew 11:23 Christ speaks of the city of Capernaum being brought down to "hell' (hades). Does this mean that the entire city, people, buildings, houses, animals, the dirt roads, etc. went down into hell and is being eternally tormented as we speak? Of course not! This speaks of the destruction of the city due to the unbelief of its people. To this day excavators cannot find the exact location of the ruins of Capernaum because it was so utterly destroyed and buried under years of dirt and sand. Expects can only speculate where the city once stood. The city was brought down into the "unseen" or brought down into its own literal grave. Death has passed on to all humans through Adam. We are all destined to die and go to the grave, hell, or the unseen, however you want to describe the unperceivable state of death. But thank God that all of us will be made alive in Christ and like Job, we all can have the expectation that God will remember us and resurrect us at our appointed time (Job 14:13)!

 

 

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