Home Page

Search Winona Post:
   GO   x 
Advanced Search
     
  Issue Date:  
  Between  
  and  
     
  Author:  
   
     
  Column / Category:  
   
     
  Issue:  
  Current Issue  
  Past Issues  
  Both  
   Help      Close     GO   Clear   
     
  Saturday December 20th, 2014    

 Submit Your Event 
S M T W T F S


 

 

 
 

| PLACE CLASSIFIED AD | PLACE EMPLOYMENT AD |

| Home | Advertise with Us | Circulation | Contact Us | About Us | Send a Letter to the Editor |
 

Marines mark contributions (04/24/2013)
From: Jim Eddy

Winona

This year marks the 100th year of operation for the Marine Corps Association. To celebrate the Associationís contributions to the development of the Marine Corps, the Leatherneck and Marine Corps Gazette will focus Marines on the challenges that have been overcome to keep the Marine Corps at the cutting edge of effectiveness in combat and other forms of operations.

This celebration in 2013 comes at a time when the focus is on the necessity to sequester funding by the national government, including the Defense Department and the Marine Corps in particular. For the Marine Corps, this is historically the reality during times of downturns in combat operations. But as the professional journals of the Marine Corps note, the leadership of the Leathernecks has been able to meet the loss of funding and personnel with the development of innovative methods of operation.

After World War I, the Marine Corps was reduced from 76,000 to some 15,000. Yet, in 1929, Commandant John Lejeune directed Lt. Col. Earl Ellis to develop the amphibious warfare doctrine later used in World War II in the Pacific and in Europe, as well as on September 13, 1950, at Inchon in Korea. This doctrine has been central to Marine operations today, including humanitarian assistance to Japan, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Yes, after every war the Marines are dramatically reduced in size, yet this has not prevented the development of helicopters in 1946, V/STOL planes, including the Harrier and Osprey, as well as tactics related to the neutralization of terrorist forces throughout the world. So the challenges facing the Marine Corps today are being met in part by the Marine Corps Association publications Leatherneck and Marine Corps Gazette. They provide a forum for Marines to reflect on our past as well as present new options for dealing with the multiple roles expected of Marines today in the areas of security for our embassies, combat operations in Africa and the Middle East, and humanitarian relief efforts.

 

 

   Copyright © 2014, Winona Post, All Rights Reserved.

 

Send this article to a friend:
Your Email: *
Friend's Email: *
 Submit 
 Back Next Page >>

 

  | PLACE CLASSIFIED AD | PLACE EMPLOYMENT AD |

| Home | Advertise with Us | Circulation | Contact Us | About Us | Send a Letter to the Editor |
 

Contact Us to
Advertise in the
Winona Post!