Home Page

Search Winona Post:
   GO   x 
Advanced Search
     
  Issue Date:  
  Between  
  and  
     
  Author:  
   
     
  Column / Category:  
   
     
  Issue:  
  Current Issue  
  Past Issues  
  Both  
   Help      Close     GO   Clear   
     
  Monday September 1st, 2014    

 Submit Your Event 
S M T W T F S


 

 

 
 

| PLACE CLASSIFIED AD | PLACE EMPLOYMENT AD |

| Home | Advertise with Us | Circulation | Contact Us | About Us | Send a Letter to the Editor |
 

  (ARCHIVES)Back to Current
Al Owne in the kitchen (08/04/2013)
By Al Owne
Itís funny, but since Iíve somewhat mastered the art of cooking, Iíve eaten out more than ever before. When I say mastered, I mean Iím able to whip up something reasonably healthy and tasty for lunch without too much excitement or drama. I took a small step the other day in my culinary progress: I bought an onion.

That might not seem like much of an advancement to you, but it was to me. My late wife thought that other than dessert or beverages, everything she served should contain onion. She found out that I could peel and chop up onions without much distress, so I became the onion man. In preparation for each meal, I fixed some form of onion. After she was gone, however, onions became something I ordered at hamburger places. I didnít think I could use a whole onion fast enough to keep it from spoiling in my refrigerator, and rotten onion is not something I like to clean up. The other day, however, I bought one, cleaned it and diced some for some spaghetti sauce I was making. I felt this was a pretty big step in my cooking education. Since then, Iíve used pieces of onion in most of my preparations.

Getting back to my opening sentence; it seems that now people are inviting me out to dinner like Iím some kind of celebrity, maybe even someone British, and once in a while I think, ďGee, I just made that tasty barbeque and Iím going to have to go out.Ē Itís really hard to please some people.

Do you think if one of the colleges offered a class on becoming a widow(er), any young or middle aged couples would take it? No? I donít think so either, yet itís one of the inevitable conditions of life. We have childbirth classes, why not mate loss classes? There are plenty of grief counseling programs after the fact and the one I took was pretty helpful in getting over the emotional and psychological bumps in the widowhood road. How about lessons in setting correct oven temperatures for men and starting that stupid lawnmower for women? I realize that death is not a real popular subject for younger people. If my wife had said, ďHoney Iíve signed us up for a class that will help the survivor when one of us dies,Ē do you think I would have been happy? Oh, I would have gone; I went to the Line Dancing lessons didnít I? But I would have thought it was a terrible waste of time. ďWe can talk about dying later; thereís plenty of time for that,Ē I would have said. Yet each day we hear of young married people being killed by accidents or disease. I can see it now: Professor Al Owne will lecture on the history of the microwave. On the other hand, maybe I have too much time on my hands.

I want to thank all of you who wished me a happy birthday on e-mail and Facebook.

Remember: we are all in this together. Reach me at alnada2704@gmail.com.

 

 

   Copyright © 2014, Winona Post, All Rights Reserved.

 

Send this article to a friend:
Your Email: *
Friend's Email: *
 Submit 
 Back Next Page >>

 

  | PLACE CLASSIFIED AD | PLACE EMPLOYMENT AD |

| Home | Advertise with Us | Circulation | Contact Us | About Us | Send a Letter to the Editor |
 

Contact Us to
Advertise in the
Winona Post!