Home Page

Search Winona Post:
   GO   x 
Advanced Search
     
  Issue Date:  
  Between  
  and  
     
  Author:  
   
     
  Column / Category:  
   
     
  Issue:  
  Current Issue  
  Past Issues  
  Both  
   Help      Close     GO   Clear   
     
  Tuesday October 21st, 2014    

 Submit Your Event 
S M T W T F S


 

 

 
 

| PLACE CLASSIFIED AD | PLACE EMPLOYMENT AD |

| Home | Advertise with Us | Circulation | Contact Us | About Us | Send a Letter to the Editor |
 

  (ARCHIVES)Back to Current
Al Owne: The fate of the Levis (07/07/2014)
Wish me luck! Iím headed to the sewing machine. I need a new pair of cut-off jean shorts. I have a fairly nice pair of Levi jeans with a white paint spot on the rear end that Iíve decided to use for this project. There was a time in my life that I could get paint, especially white, on my clothes whenever I came within 20 feet of a new wet coat.

I set those jeans aside and thought Iíd use them when I painted. That was a good idea, but I had another pair that had lots of paint on them; besides they were Rustlers, not Levis, so I used them instead when I painted. Therefore the white tailed pair lay folded in the closet waiting for their fate. It is now at hand.

On the advice of my physician/counselor, I try to follow my late wifeís lead in household chores. She thought that anyone who bought a pair of cut-off jeans was a phony. When the knees or cuffs got raggy on jeans, you made them shorts. The Levis in question donít have holes in the knees, just paint on the butt, but that puts them in the cut-off pile.

I figure people donít pay much attention to someone wearing cut-off jeans, especially an old someone, so Iíll just use a blue magic marker and be okay. Itís only recently that Iíve worn shorts in public anyway. In my growing up period of life, males didnít wear shorts. Young males wore ďshort pants,Ē and couldnít wait until they graduated into ďlong pants,Ē which were a sign of maturity.

During WWII, parents in Allied European countries sometimes sent their children to the United States where they would be safer. The city I grew up in was divided ethnically, and I lived in the Northern European District. In eighth grade, 1943-1944, we got a couple of English boys in our school who wore shorts. Of course we red-blooded American boys took that as a sign of sissyness; however after we received a few black eyes, we tended to overlook their clothes and they became part of the gang. (ďGangĒ in 1940s speak; not today.)

No matter; I had to actually throw away a couple pair of cut-offs, so I have to get busy at the sewing machine unless I can con some female type into doing it for me. Weíll see.

 

 

   Copyright © 2014, Winona Post, All Rights Reserved.

 

Send this article to a friend:
Your Email: *
Friend's Email: *
 Submit 
 Back Next Page >>

 

  | PLACE CLASSIFIED AD | PLACE EMPLOYMENT AD |

| Home | Advertise with Us | Circulation | Contact Us | About Us | Send a Letter to the Editor |
 

Contact Us to
Advertise in the
Winona Post!